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Cell Lineage Specification in Tumor Progression and Metastasis


Recent Advances in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Biology and Clinical Management

Abstract: Despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy over the last decades, the death rate from lung cancer has remained largely unchanged, which is mainly due to metastatic disease. Because of the overall poor prognosis, new treatment strategies for lung cancer patients are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize recent advances in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) screening and diagnostic workup. We discuss current clinical management, highlighting stage-specific therapy approaches, chemotherapy options for advanced-stage patients, along with new agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies, and the EGFR-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib, and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor crizotinib. Finally, we give an outlook into NSCLC disease biology, focusing on the importance of EGFR activating mutations and the role of the tumor-microenvironment. CXCR4 chemokine receptors expressed on NSCLC cells are a central pathway of NSCLC cross talk with the tumor microenvironment, as they induce activation, migration, and tumor cell adhesion to stromal cells, which in turn provides growth- and drug resistance-signals. Because of the growing evidence that the microenvironment in NSCLC promotes disease progression, we expect that selected molecular pathways of cross talk between NSCLC cells and their microenvironment will become alternative therapeutic targets in the near future. ... Read more

Inactivation of the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene and Activation of the Ras Oncogene: Cooperative Events in Tumorigenesis

Abstract: Since the discovery of the tumor suppressor p53 and the Ras oncogene, ample data have been accumulated, describing their aberrations in human cancer and their contribution to the multistep process of tumorigenesis. Several studies have also demonstrated that these dysregulated pathways cooperate to promote malignancy. Here we review recent studies on the cooperative molecular mechanisms by which p53 inactivation and oncogenic Ras converge to enhance tumorigenesis. ... Read more

State of the Art and Future Perspectives for the Use of Insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor 1 (IGF-1R) Targeted Treatment Strategies in Solid Tumors

Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) with its ligands and intracellular pathway is involved in cell growth and survival control. Many studies have shown how IGF-1R is over-expressed in various tumor cell lines and histological samples. In recent years many trials have been conducted investigating IGF-1R as a possible cancer therapy, with major efforts focusing on the use of monoclonal antibodies and small molecules directed against the IGF-1R-driven pathway. Several drugs are currently under intense investigation and in different experimental phases. Available data suggest that this class of drugs is well tolerated with mild to moderate side effects, when used alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents. The efficacy profile seems to be promising. However, further studies are needed to define the exact role of IGF-1R inhibitors in clinical practice. ... Read more

Tracking the Seed and Tending the Soil: Evolving Concepts in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Abstract: Metastasis, the process whereby cancer cells spread from their primary site of origin and grow in adjacent or distant sites, is the primary cause of death in cancer patients. The last 30 years has witnessed significant progress in decreasing cancer mortality rates -- largely as a result of improved screening and prevention, practical applications of cancer genomics, and less toxic, more targeted therapies. Despite these improvements, metastasis relentlessly drives mortality. The pervasive mortality from metastasis highlights the shortcomings of traditionally accepted hypotheses on the metastatic process. Historically, metastasis has been described as a unidirectional process, whereby cancer cells leave a primary tumor and seed metastasis in regional lymph nodes or distant sites. This anatomically based hypothesis has dictated much of our medical, and in particular, surgical approach to treating cancers. Alternatively, recent research indicates that metastasis is a multidirectional process whereby cancer cells can seed distant sites as well as the primary tumor itself. The multidirectional pathway of cancer cells, termed "self-seeding," has been corroborated in several experimental and clinical models. This review will evaluate the "self-seeding" hypothesis with attention both to the "seed" (cancer cells) as well as the "soil" (premetastatic niche). Increasingly, the role of the microenvironment surrounding metastases appears essential to the survival of metastatic colonies. The self-seeding model depends not only on the inherent mobility of cancer cells, but also on the supporting non-cancerous cells which enable circulating tumors cells to migrate to and survive in distant sites. The recognition that some of these non-cancerous cells include key components of the immune system has re-ignited the field of immunotherapy in cancer. One particular area of immunotherapy research, tumor entrained neutrophils, will be reviewed in more depth. Ultimately, understanding the dynamic interplay between cancer cells and the metastatic niche offers fertile ground for progress both in the treatment and prevention of metastasis. ... Read more

SOX17 Methylation Inhibits Its Antagonism of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Lung Cancer

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore epigenetic changes and functions of SOX17 in human lung cancer. Five lung cancer cell lines and 88 primary lung cancer samples were examined in this study. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, immunohistochemistry, luciferase reporter assays, colony-formation assays, and western blotting were used to analyze methylation changes and functions of SOX17 in lung cancer. SOX17 methylation was found in 60.2% of primary human lung cancer samples, and promoter region methylation of SOX17 silenced its expression. SOX17 methylation was associated with female patients and lung cancer differentiation. Colony-formation assays revealed that SOX17 suppressed lung cancer cell proliferation. Re-expression of SOX17 inhibited Wnt signaling in H23 lung cancer cell line. SOX17 acts as a Wnt signaling inhibitor. ... Read more

The Nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Network and Its Role in Cancer

Abstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). EGFR activation via ligand binding results in signaling through various pathways ultimately resulting in cellular proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR has been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and brain cancer. Thus intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of EGFR by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab and panitumumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domain (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Although targeting membrane-bound EGFR has shown benefit, a new and emerging role for EGFR is now being elucidated. In this review we will summarize the current knowledge of the nuclear EGFR signaling network, including how it is trafficked to the nucleus, the functions it serves in the nucleus, and how these functions impact cancer progression, survival, and response to chemotherapeutics. ... Read more

Prolactin in Breast and Prostate Cancer: Molecular and Genetic Perspectives

Abstract: Prostate and breast cancers affect millions of men and women, respectively. Advanced forms of the disease, which can no longer be controlled by hormonal disruption or chemotherapy, have very limited treatment options. Consequently, there is a major benefit to identify new targets for therapy in both types of cancer. The prolactin (PRL) signaling cascade, by virtue of its importance to the pathology of both diseases, has emerged as a potential treatment target. To date, several methods for antagonizing the PRL receptor (PRLR) and its signaling pathways have been developed which include protein-based and small molecule antagonists. However, a better understanding of the genetic and molecular characteristics of the PRL cascade is needed for the successful therapeutic application of antagonists. At the level of genetics, it is necessary to determine the functional significance of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PRLR and their association with disease prevalence and severity. At the molecular level, a comprehensive knowledge of interactions of the PRL signaling pathway with other oncogenic molecules is warranted so as to identify beneficial combinatorial strategies. This review discusses multiple features of the PRL signaling cascade and how they can be exploited in the search for effective therapies for patients with breast and prostate cancers. ... Read more

Implementation of Biomarker-Driven Cancer Therapy: Existing Tools and Remaining Gaps

Abstract: There has been growing interest in biomarker-driven personalized cancer therapy, also known as precision medicine. Recently, dozens of molecular tests, including next generation sequencing, have been developed to detect biomarkers that have the potential to predict response of cancers to particular targeted therapies. However, detection of cancer-related biomarkers is only the first step in the battle. Deciding what therapy options to pursue can also be daunting, especially when tumors harbor more than one potentially actionable aberration. Further, different mutations/variants in a single gene may have different functional consequences, and response to targeted agents may be context dependent. However, early clinical trials with new molecular entities are increasingly conducted in a biomarker-selected fashion, and even when trials are not biomarker-selected, much effort is placed on enrolling patients onto clinical trials where they have the highest probability of response. We review available molecular tests and therapy discerning tools, including tools available for assessing functional consequences of molecular alterations and tools for finding applicable clinical trials, which exist to help bridge the gap between detection of cancer-related biomarker to the initiation of biomarker-matched targeted therapies. ... Read more

Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

Abstract: Prostate cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of prostate cancer could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. In this review article, we will summarize the most recent advances in the prostate CSCs field, with particular emphasis on targeting prostate CSCs to treat prostate cancer. ... Read more

The Vitamin D Receptor: A Tumor Suppressor in Skin

Abstract: Epidemiologic evidence supporting a major chemopreventive role for vitamin D in various malignancies is strong. Likewise the use of the active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, and its analogs to prevent and/or treat a wide variety of malignancies in animals is well established. The evidence has been less compelling for epidermal carcinogenesis perhaps because the same agent that produces vitamin D in the skin, UVB radiation (UVR), is also the same agent that results in most epidermal malignancies. However, recent studies indicate that the role of vitamin D and its receptor (VDR) in protecting against the development of epidermal tumors deserves a closer look. One such study found mice lacking the VDR were quite sensitive to epidermal tumor formation following the administration of the carcinogen DMBA. A more recent study showed that these mice were similarly more sensitive to tumor formation following UVR, results we have confirmed. The epidermis of the VDR null mouse is hyperproliferative with gross distortion of hair follicles, structures that may provide the origin for the tumors found in the skin following such treatment. Two interacting pathways critical for epidermal and hair follicle function, β-catenin and hedgehog (Hh), result in epidermal tumors when they are activated abnormally. Thus, we considered the possibility that loss of VDR predisposes to epidermal tumor formation by activation of either or both β-catenin and Hh signaling. We determined that all elements of the Hh signaling pathway are upregulated in the epidermis and utricles of the VDR null mouse, and that 1,25(OH)2D3 suppresses the expression of these elements in normal mouse skin. In addition we observed that the transcriptional activity of β-catenin was increased in keratinocytes lacking the VDR. These results lead us to the hypothesis that the VDR with its ligand 1,25(OH)2D3 functions as a tumor suppressor with respect to epidermal tumor formation in response to UVR by regulating Hh and β-catenin signaling. ... Read more

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